Monday, June 13, 2011

Breaking plateaus

It is inevitable, but plateaus happen during training.

But if you look at the phenoms that dominate competition and blast through the ranks in a matter of 3, 4, or 5 years, something very different is happening. Are they better learners? Do they have better instruction? Surely something in their training differs.

In my opinion, I believe it really comes down to examining the weakest part of your game.

Watching matches of yours taped on video help the most in this regard (especially matches you lost).

An expert/instructor may watch the match and conclude that you did everything wrong and should change even basic strategy (which you may not have even known until asking)

Someone less experienced may point out just one flaw.

Regardless it is important to get everyone's opinion/advice and adjust accordingly.

Asking "where did I get stuck in this match" and "where did I have no answer to what my opponent did" often times leads to a very quick answer in terms of what to work on next (and breaks plateaus).

Now a video on guard passing by Vitor Shaolin Ribiero

12 comments:

Salted Plum said...

Very good advice (o^-')b

Jammer said...

I hate when I hit a plateau.

Chris Hashemi said...

I've found changing up partners helps. I was grappling with one of the best guys at my gym for about a month, and at first it really improved my game, but then I started feeling like I was defending the same few moves over and over again.

The Dawg said...

Like everything in life, you can't do it all by yourself. Feedback and support from others will always give a better result.

slycoopert said...

Thanks for the motivation I will turn my plateau into a Mountian!

Jonny said...

Couldn't agree more The Dawg.

JamieGraham09 said...

nice advice, criticism is always good to take notice of to improve!

pepsi_lover47 said...

wow awesome stuff man keep it coming

LightStand said...

Thanks for the advice, that's always a way to improve yourself in anything

zemzero said...

Great tips

Mike said...

Passing the guard is def one of the hardest aspects of BJJ.

Chave Do Quarto said...

nice!