Sunday, June 12, 2011

Playing your game

In tournaments, my coaches have always told me to play my game.

To a beginner, that may sound a bit confusing though. What exactly does that mean?

Personally, I feel that this is contingent on the competitor being actually good at a handful of moves. Afterwards, you can try your hardest to score points or win by forcing the opponent only to face that part of your game (until the rest of your game strengthens).

If you are not excellent at a few moves, you can NOT "play your game" in a tournament.

In a Lloyd Irvin article I read online many years ago, they said that he makes all of his best guys drill positions/moves 3000 times before they can move on to the next one. Doesn't matter how long it takes, but they have to put in the reps. And when you watch videos of amazing competitors like Ryan Hall, Mike Fowler, JT Torres, etc, they all execute certain moves with black belt expertise (often times way before they actually were black belts)

So next time you are in training, remember how important drilling these moves are!

Here is a highlight of Pablo Popovitch, Abu Dhabi Champ!

25 comments:

Jammer said...

I have been in a gym where did each mover 30 times, before moving on to something else.

Jack said...

sounds like training in dragonball Z

bmx4130 said...

3000 times is a lot. I can't imagine having to do that. I understand though that they want it drilled in your head and for it to become a reflex instead of something you have to think about.

movie68 said...

Reminded me of the movie Semi-Pro for some reason. We're going to run this til you can do it in your sleep.

James said...

Really interesting, please write more! I wish I could fight like these people.

pepsi_lover47 said...

SOunds interesting enough. Diversity is an advantage is any field, especially in hand to hand combat.

theSound said...

You all need the hyperbolic time chamber. follower +1

The Dawg said...

I guess you have to push yourself if you want to get good.

Expected Destiny said...

practice makes perfect, how do you think pros get to being pros? they make shots thousands of times

Shreddie Murphy said...

Gotta respect that! Great post, followed!

Astaroth said...

Wow. Just... wow. the determination is just crazy.

JamieGraham09 said...

Training must take a longggg time, but if you win at the end it must be worth it

fulano tal said...

I need to go to the gim :|

Salted Plum said...

3000 is a new number, you always hear about 10000 in sports

Bunny Muffins said...

This just proves that winning is everything in these sports. With this amount of time and training, why wouldn't it be? 3,000...That is a LOT.

Kingmush said...

Great insight actually.

disraelyan said...

Good write. Really interesting stuff!

The R00STER said...

that sounds like it can apply to a lot of sports

The Pro said...

perfect practice makes perfect. +1

pv said...

woah this is like some serious intense dbz workout lol

LightStand said...

Nice insight, sounds like practice makes perfect here. And i never really knew what people meant play your game, but i do now, thanks

zemzero said...

wow, that's dedication for sure. I wonder how long it takes on average.

Ben said...

Wow, 3000 repetitions of the same move. That would get so tiring/boring, but it would be good training!

Geoffrey said...

the more you do just about anything, the more comfortable you'll become. I think it's good advice from your coach to stick to what you know in the heat of battle.

Follower #99872301 said...

very cool video once again